Flourishing

Mark 4:26-34

I’ve always enjoyed gardening.  When I was first ordained, Becky and I were serving a country church in Iowa and our parsonage was at least a quarter of a mile from the next house. We liked to say that 3,000 hogs were our closest neighbors. Anyway, because we were in such a rural location, we had the opportunity to plant a large garden. Now, it didn’t matter that I’d been gardening most of my adult life or that I had a background in the garden center industry, I was still the recipient of unsolicited gardening advice from some the members of my congregation.

One piece of advice that stands out came when our youth group was planting the back part of my garden with pumpkins and gourds for a mission fundraiser.  I was standing there, hoe in hand, contemplating the best way to plant these seeds, when, one of the kids took the hoe from my hand and, without a word, began to make mounds of dirt. He then planted a few seeds in each mound. It was an amusing and humbling moment. So, I decided that I needed to check my ego and listen to the advice offered by these experienced farmers, even if the farmer was only twelve-years-old.

Now, as I think about that experience, I realize that there are many ways to plant seeds.  You can plant them in mounds, as I discovered back in Iowa. You can scatter seeds. You can plant them neatly in rows, one at a time. You even get seed tapes that space the seeds correctly, so you don’t plant them too close together. There are many ways to plant seeds.

As we come to the Gospel reading from Mark for today, Jesus offers us two parables about seeds; two different ways of planting seeds as it were. First, Jesus shares a parable that compares the Reign of God with the mysterious, hidden way of a seed’s growth. A process that fascinates us even today, in spite of our technological progress. And in the second, the parable of the mustard seed, Jesus tells us that the smallest of all seeds, when it matures, grows into the largest of all shrubs. Now, it’s not explicit here, but in the later synoptic gospels, the writers directly connect the mustard seed with faith.

So, why is this important?

Well, this is a clever way to illustrate the nature of God. We know that God is mysterious, unknowable in many ways. But we also know that God plants seeds.  Seeds of wisdom, seeds of compassion; seeds that help us to understand the nature of God. Now, we don’t fully understand this nature, but we sort of know, because of Jesus and his example of how to live in relationship with others. And it’s when we live-out our faith, even the tiniest seed of faith, that the Reign of God, flourishes; that Jesus’ hope for justice and peace on earth, flourishes.

But what might the planting of one tiny seed look like?

Well, as I said before, there are many different ways to plant seeds. A small act of kindness or service perhaps, or a simple expression of faith, or the slightest movement toward God.  All of these things contribute to making this world a better place; which is what the Reign of God seeks to accomplish. These are the seeds of faith that have been planted within each of us.

As I say this, I’m reminded of the words of Thoreau, “I have great faith in a seed,” he once said, “convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders.” [i]

My friends… expect wonders. But it won’t always be easy. Whenever we plant seeds, there’s always a chance that birds will come and eat them or that a lack of rain will dry them up or that weeds will choke them out. But, as author Anne Lamott states, “When God is going to do something wonderful, He or She always starts with a hardship; when God is going to do something amazing, He or She starts with an impossibility.”[ii]

We are called to do something amazing.  And whatever hardships we might be enduring right now can be transformed into something wonderful. And whatever “stuff” your friends or neighbors might be going though, calls on us to plant seeds within and around them; seeds of hope, seeds of faith, seeds of healing. When we tend God’s garden, when we become God’s gardeners, when our actions serve as examples of God grace and compassion and love for all people, and when we become preservers and restorers of this beautiful planet we call home; it amazing and it’s wonderful and …and, it’s all a part of the Reign of God; God’s present Kingdom here on earth.

Let me leave you with a quote that I read this week that kind of put all this in perspective for me. “Lord, when I feel that what I’m doing is insignificant and unimportant, help me to remember that everything I do is significant and important in your eyes, because you love me, and you put me here, and no one else can do what I am doing in exactly the way I do it.”[iii]

May we all go forth from this service today and continue to be God gardeners in this world. Planting seeds of hope, seeds of faith, seeds of justice and peace; and may we plant in a way no one else could. That’s our calling. That’s our challenge. That’s the seed of our faith.

Amen.

[i] David Henry Thoreau quoted by Katheryn Matthews in God’s Role for Me. (www.ucc.org/samuel) 2018.

[ii] Anne Lamott. Plan B: Further Thoughts on Faith. (Riverhead Books, 2004.)

[iii] Brennan Manning. Souvenirs of Solitude: Finding Rest in Abba’s Embrace. (www.ucc.org/samuel, 2018)

 

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